News

ByQuantum Communications

Bonfire and fireworks advice

Scots have been issued with advice on how to safely enjoy this year’s Bonfire Night.

The country’s new national consumer advice service has published advice around fireworks sales, the impact on pets, and how to stay safe.

Last month, a Scottish Government consultation found that 94 per cent of people want more controls over the sale of fireworks and 87 per cent would welcome a ban on the sale of fireworks to the public in Scotland.

Sainsbury’s has announced a ban on the sale of fireworks and other retailers are selling low-noise fireworks.

Advice from consumeradvice.scot on fireworks and bonfires:

The law:
The Fireworks Regulations 2004 requires a retailer to display a sign where fireworks are supplied or exposed for supply, stating that it is illegal to a) sell adult fireworks or sparklers to anyone under 18; b) for anyone under 18 to possess adult fireworks.
Anyone with concerns about illegal fireworks can contact consumeradvice.scot for free, impartial and practical advice.

Animals:
Keep animals indoors, in the quietest part of the property.
Pets should not be left alone for long periods of time, especially on the louder nights, and owners are advised to act as calmly as possible with pets, rewarding calm behaviour, using the sounds of TV or radio as background noise and comfort.

Safety:
Always try to attend an officially organised display – be aware of surroundings if setting a bonfire at home
If a bonfire must be set at home, ensure this is kept well away from buildings,
vehicles, trees, hedges, fences, power lines, telecommunications equipment and sheds. Bonfires should not impact upon visibility on roads or otherwise inconvenience vehicles.


Be conscious of your own and neighbour’s wellbeing (including any animals)
Ensure that smoke / flying embers from the fire do not cause a nuisance to neighbours’ person or property. Remember that certain materials can cause the emission of harmful smoke and combustion. Pressurised containers and sealed vessels amongst bonfire material pose a risk of explosion – be aware. Ensure pets are kept indoors and in as quiet a place as possible.


Alcohol and fire don’t mix
Don’t go near fireworks or bonfires when under the influence of alcohol. Ignoring local by-laws and drinking in public places is still illegal. Police may issue fixed penalty tickets or send a report in relation to this to the Procurator Fiscal.


Don’t throw fireworks onto the bonfire and avoid use of flammable liquids to ignite bonfires.
Use proprietary firelighters and avoid flammable liquids


Never leave a burning / smouldering bonfire unsupervised and never leave children unsupervised.
Make sure that bonfires are completely extinguished and not left unattended. Keep children safe by ensuring they are kept away from bonfires and at a safe distance from fireworks.

Lorna Yelland, team leader with consumeradvice.scot, said:
“This Bonfire Night, the best advice is to enjoy it safely.
“When buying fireworks, the law is clear – it is illegal to sell adult fireworks to children or for anyone under 18 to possess adult fireworks.
“This can be a stressful time for pets, and we would advise owners to keep animals in the quietest part of the property and act as calmly as possible if fireworks are going off outside.
“It is vital to stay safe, and the best advice is to try to attend an officially organised display. If you are building a bonfire at home or setting off fireworks, be aware of surroundings, be conscious of your neighbours and pets, never leave children unsupervised, and remember that alcohol and fireworks don’t mix.
“Anyone with any consumer-related queries can contact the national consumer advice service, consumeradvice.scot, for free, impartial and practical advice.”

NOTES

consumeradvice.scot is the country’s new national consumer advice service, and was launched in April this year with Scottish Government funding following the devolution of further powers to Holyrood. It provides free and impartial advice to people on any consumer issues.
Experts advise people of their legal rights, and can also refer complaints to Trading Standards Scotland for investigation, but cannot carry out legal action on a consumer’s behalf.
The service is operated by the charity Advice Direct Scotland.

ByQuantum Communications

International Islamic finance taskforce established

A new international taskforce is to be created with the support of the UK Government to engage the Islamic finance industry with the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals.

The high-level Islamic Finance and Sustainable Development Goals (SGDs) taskforce will be anchored in London and run by the Glasgow-based Islamic Finance Council UK (UKIFC).

Economic Secretary to the Treasury John Glen said the new initiative will ‘drive forward innovation around the world’.

The UK Government will be the founding country partner when it begins in 2020, with an aim to promote understanding and encourage adoption of the UN SDGs amongst Islamic financial institutions.

Gatehouse Bank has confirmed participation and interest has already been expressed from Malaysia and Dubai, as well as other UK organisations.

The UN’s SDGs are the blueprint to achieve a better and more sustainable future for all, addressing issues such as climate change, education and equality.

But a recent analysis from UKIFC and Malaysia-based ISRA found a considerable lack of knowledge, misunderstandings and minimal engagement by Islamic financial institutions with the SDGs.

Islamic finance is one of the fastest growing sectors in the global financial industry, with assets expected to reach US $3.8 trillion in 2022.

Innovative financial structuring in the sector can help create instruments that drive capital towards the SDGs.

The UK – and London in particular – has already become a centre for Islamic finance, helping finance developments such as The Shard and the Olympic Village.

In 2014, the UK Government cemented the UK’s position as a hub for Islamic finance by becoming the first western country to issue sovereign Sukuk – Islamic bonds.

With the City’s strength in conventional financial services, the strong legal framework and progressive outlook it continues to intellectually innovative and assist developments in the global Islamic finance arena.

The UKIFC was established in 2005 as a specialist advisory and developmental body focused on promoting and enhancing the global Islamic and ethical finance industry. It was the first global specialist Islamic finance body to sign up to the UN Principles of Responsible Banking (PRB).

With Gatehouse Bank the only fully Shariah-compliant signatory, the UK is leading the way in relation to the Islamic finance sector’s engagement with the global framework that aligns with the SDGs.

In 2016, the Church of Scotland and the UKIFC signed a partnership agreement to co-develop an ethical finance solution open to all society, regardless of race, religion or ethnic background and based on the shared values between the faith traditions.

The UKIFC supported this month’s Ethical Finance 2019 global summit in Edinburgh, which brought together over 400 senior representatives from more than 200 companies and organisation.

The Economic Secretary to the Treasury, John Glen MP, said:
“The UK is a world leader in Islamic Finance, so I am pleased we’re now a founding country partner and observer member of the new Islamic Finance SDG Taskforce.
“This Taskforce will bring together the global Islamic finance community so it can help us meet our international, environmental and sustainability objectives – using UK expertise in sustainable finance to drive forward innovation around the world.”

Richard de Belder, Advisory Board Member of the Islamic Finance Council UK, said:
“Delivering the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals will require private sector involvement.
“But business-as-usual in the global financial arena will not deliver the 2030 goals.
“A step-change in private investment in SDGs is required, and Islamic finance, as one of the fastest growing sectors in the global financial industry, provides a unique opportunity for innovative solutions.
“We need a fairer system of financial management that delivers more than just profit and the inherent principles within Islamic finance are naturally aligned to the sustainability agenda.
“This new taskforce will explore ways to bring people and institutions together to help achieve the UN SDGs.”

Charles Haresnape, CEO, Gatehouse Bank, said:
“We welcome the opportunity to support and participate in the Islamic Finance and Sustainable Development Goals Taskforce.
“Our Shariah-compliant finance principles mean that our products and services are ethical by design and as a founding signatory of the UN’s Principles for Responsible Banking, Gatehouse Bank has committed to strategically aligning its business with the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals.
“We are confident that the taskforce will play a significant role in identifying innovative solutions for sustainable finance in the future.”

NOTES

More information on the Islamic Finance Council UK can be found here: https://www.ukifc.com/

The Islamic Finance Council UK (UKIFC) is a specialist, not-for-profit, advisory and developmental body focused on promoting and enhancing the global Islamic and ethical finance industry. It has helped six countries develop enabling regulatory frameworks for Islamic finance, enhancing financial inclusion to over 15 million people, established the award-winning Ethical Finance Round Table series running since 2010, launched the world’s first joint venture between Islamic finance and the Church of Scotland, and delivered development sessions to over 500 Islamic scholars across the globe.

The framework of an Islamic financial system is based on elements of Sharia (the law of Islam) which governs Islamic societies. The fundamental concept of Islamic finance is that money has no intrinsic value and should only be used as a measure of worth.

ByQuantum Communications

Only 13% of Scots chose their pension investment portfolio

PRESS RELEASE FROM THE ETHICAL FINANCE HUB

Only 13 per cent of Scots who have a pension actively chose their own investment portfolio, a new poll has revealed to mark the start of a global summit on ethical finance.

The YouGov poll of over 1,000 adults in Scotland also found that nearly a third don’t have a pension at all.

But two-thirds of Scots said it is important that banks and other financial institutions take into account ethical, environmental and social issues when making investments.

As individuals increasingly look towards modifying their buying and disposal behaviour to mitigate against climate change, the evidence suggests that many consumers are unaware of the positive impact they could have through closer management of their pensions.  

The research was commissioned by the Ethical Finance Hub as part of the Ethical Finance 2019 global summit which gets underway in Edinburgh today, bringing together over 300 senior figures from more than 200 companies and organisations, representing global assets worth $10trillion.

It aims to promote a fairer system of financial management that combines profit with better outcomes for people and the planet.

There will be a keynote address from First Minister Nicola Sturgeon, and video addresses from former Prime Minister Gordon Brown and the Archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby.

The YouGov poll reveals:

•            86% of adults in Scotland do not consider they are an investor in finance.

•            But a majority of Scots are investors in finance because they have a pension, while 29% said they do not have a pension.

•            Only 13% of those with a pension actively chose their own pension/investment portfolio; while 44% said their provider invested their pension in a ‘default’ fund.

•            67% said it is important that financial institutions take into account ethical, environmental and social issues when making financial investments.

•            63% said it is important that financial institutions should have a critical role in addressing the current climate situation.

Ethical finance is a fairer system of financial management that combines profit with better outcomes for people and the planet.

The Edinburgh-based Ethical Finance Hub is focused on raising awareness, educating and facilitating practical activities such as research, events and projects that support the growth of the ethical finance sector.

This week’s event, organised by the Global Ethical Finance Initiative (GEFI) and held at the RBS headquarters in Edinburgh, will focus on promoting the Scottish capital as the global home of ethical finance, with an opportunity to create thousands of sustainable job opportunities.

The summit will also explore how to make finance investments work for the planet in the face of the climate emergency.

The two-day event is supported by the Scottish Government, and bodies represented include the United Nations, Bank of England, the Financial Conduct Authority, RBS, Baillie Gifford and HSBC.

Chris Tait, project manager of the Ethical Finance Hub, said:

“The global summit in Edinburgh will bring together the world’s business, political, and social leaders to build a fairer finance system for people and the planet.

“Ethical finance matters for people because, over the years, trust in banks has diminished and today’s generation of consumers believes that investment decisions should reflect the issues they care about, such as the environment.

“That’s why this poll shows that two-thirds of Scots believe it is important for financial institutions to take into account ethical, environmental and social issues when making their investments.

“But any individual with a pension is an investor, even though they may not necessarily consider that they are.

“Very few people choose their own pension investment portfolio, so a greater shift towards personal demand for ethical finance will encourage banks and asset managers to do the same.

“With nearly a third of adults in Scotland not having a pension at all, it’s also time to raise awareness of the importance of making ethical investments in the future, both for individuals and the planet.”

ENDS

NOTES

All figures, unless otherwise stated, are from YouGov Plc. Total sample size was 1,008 adults. Fieldwork was undertaken between 3rd – 7th October 2019. The survey was carried out online. The figures have been weighted and are representative of all Scottish adults (aged 18+).

The full tables can be downloaded here

More information on Ethical Finance 2019, including a list of speakers, is available here

More details on the Ethical Finance Hub are available here

ByQuantum Communications

New crackdown on ticket tout scams

Scotland’s consumer advice service and Trading Standards have teamed up to tackle ticket tout scams.

Music, theatre and sports fans are being encouraged to contact the consumeradvice.scot service if they don’t receive the information they are entitled to when purchasing a secondary ticket in person or via a resale website.

Consumers can receive free and impartial advice on their rights as part of the awareness campaign, and the body can also pass information to Trading Standards for investigation.

consumeradvice.scot is the country’s new dedicated consumer advice service, which is operated by the charity Advice Direct Scotland. It provides advice, assistance and information to people on a range of consumer issues and concerns.

The awareness campaign highlights that consumer protection law means sellers must tell buyers:

•            Where they will be sitting or standing, and if this has a restricted view;

•            Information about any access restrictions such as an age restriction, a requirement for particular ID or a credit card to access the venue, or if the ticket is for a disabled access area;

•            The original face value of the ticket(s);

•            Whether they have any relationship with the secondary ticketing platform, the organiser, or their agents.

Recently, East Ayrshire Council’s Trading Standards service issued a financial penalty to a prolific ticket reseller located in the west of Scotland. 

This was the first such fine to be issued in Scotland and, on being paid without appeal, has also become the first successful case of its kind in the UK. 

The financial penalty related to tickets being resold for Still Game’s run of shows at the SSE Hydro in Glasgow. Information regarding the seating location was not disclosed, contrary to s.90 of the Consumer Rights Act 2015. 

Andrew Bartlett, chief executive of consumeradvice.scot, said:

“When it comes to secondary ticketing, Scots consumers have rights they may not be aware of. Buyers must be told where they are sitting or standing, any restrictions, and the face value of the ticket.

“Our advisers can offer free and impartial advice on consumer rights, and by teaming up with Trading Standards Scotland we can report instances for investigation where sellers have not complied with the requirements.”

Fiona Richardson, chief officer of Trading Standards Scotland, said:

“The law clearly sets out the information consumers must be told, and need to know, in order to make informed choices in this market.  We would urge anyone with information about misleading ticket sales, to report this to Trading Standards via Advice Direct Scotland.  We are committed to working with local authorities and other partners, to take action where the law is being broken.”

ENDS

NOTES TO EDITORS

consumeradvice.scot is operated by the charity Advice Direct Scotland. Consumers can seek help in a number of different ways: freephone 0808 164 6000; online and web chat at www.consumeradvice.scot; and email via advice@consumeradvice.scot

Consumer advisors can provide practical and impartial advice on how to resolve consumer problems, inform people of consumer laws which may apply to their situation, provide template letters which consumers can use to contact the trader or service provider they are having issues with, and pass relevant information onto Trading Standards for further investigation. They cannot make a complaint on an individual’s behalf or carry out any legal action on an individual’s behalf.

Trading Standards Scotland is the national team for trading standards in Scotland. The team is funded by the UK Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy and managed by the Convention of Scottish Local Authorities (COSLA); the representative body of local government in Scotland.  Operationally, TSS undertakes cross boundary and national enforcement work on consumer protection matters in Scotland.  It also has a duty to co-ordinate and assist local authority trading standards teams in taking local action on issues of national significance.

ByQuantum Communications

New tartan showcases UN’s goals

The world’s first tartan celebrating sustainable development goals (SDGs) has been created and presented to the United Nations in New York.

Read some of the media coverage in The National here

The innovative project is designed to help promote the goals worldwide and demonstrate Scotland’s support for the aims, using all 17 colours of the UN’s SDGs.

SDGs are a collection of global goals to achieve a better and more sustainable future for all which were set by United Nations General Assembly in 2015.

The prototype tartan was the brainchild of the Global Ethical Finance Initiative (GEFI) and designed in conjunction with renowned Edinburgh-based kiltmakers Slanj, and has received the support of the Scottish Government.

Along with a letter from the government, the design was this week unveiled to Achim Steiner, the administrator of the United Nations Development Programme, at the UN General Assembly in New York.

The prototype tartan will now be reviewed and submitted for entry on The Scottish Register of Tartans, and will later be used for kilts and other products.

In Scotland, the SDGs are implemented as part of the government’s national performance framework.

GEFI brings together the world’s business, political, and social leaders to build a fairer finance system for people and the planet. It wants a fairer system of financial management that delivers more than just profit.

It will host a global summit on ethical finance in Edinburgh on October 8 and 9, with First Minister Nicola Sturgeon delivering the keynote speech and a video address by the Archbishop of Canterbury.

Chris Tait, Executive Manager of the Global Ethical Finance Initiative, said:
“The connection between the UN’s sustainable development goals and Scotland inspired us to create the world’s first SDG tartan.
“This project aims to further promote the goals both in Scotland and worldwide through an easily recognised visual symbol for all the SDGs, which also clearly links to Scottish culture and history by using a tartan.
“It’s the perfect metaphor for the importance of looking at the SDGs as an interconnected unit to build a fairer world, rather than looking at each SDG individually.
“Achim Steiner was delighted with the tartan and said he would be hanging it on his wall.”

In a letter to Mr Steiner, Ben Macpherson MSP, Scottish Government Minister for Europe, Migration and International Development, wrote:
“Tartan has an iconic status globally and domestically in Scotland, and is instantly recognisable as Scottish. The new SDGs tartan links Scotland’s rich cultural past and our outward facing future together with our core values, historical and contemporary, of fairness and equality.
“It is fitting, therefore, that GEFI have developed this new Tartan as a symbol of Scotland’s dedication to achieving and promoting the SDGs both at home and overseas.”

Brian Halley, managing director of Slanj, said:
“It has been an honour for Slanj to work on the SDG tartan and products with the GEFI team.
“We hope that this wonderfully vibrant tartan design can help highlight and support the UN Sustainable Development Goals.”

NOTES

The UN’s Sustainable Development Goals can be found here: https://www.undp.org/content/undp/en/home/sustainable-development-goals.html

More information on the Global Ethical Finance Initiative is available here: https://www.globalethicalfinance.org/

The tartan is using all 17 colours of the SDGs. The colours for the tartan were carefully chosen: the thicker horizontal stripes are the for the SDGs representing the biosphere – SDG6, SDG13, SDG14, SDG15. They are horizontal as they are the fundamental basis for all the other SDGs that cut across them. The thicker vertical stripes represent SDG8 – SDG most important for financial services, SDG10 and SDG17 – representing the importance of partnerships globally and for achieving the aims of the Global Ethical Finance Initiative.

What is the Global Ethical Finance Initiative?
The Global Ethical Finance Initiative (GEFI) oversees, organises and coordinates a series of programmes to promote finance for positive change.
It brings together the world’s business, political, and social leaders to build a fairer finance system for people and the planet.

What is ethical finance?
A fairer system of financial management that combines profit with better outcomes for people and the planet.

Why does ethical finance matter?
Although ethical finance is not a new concept the financial crisis has led to a growing interest in sustainability, climate change and social justice. This has seen a collective desire to create a fairer, more inclusive and responsible global financial system.
Trust in banks is diminishing and today’s generation of consumers believes that investment decisions should reflect the issues they care about. Ethical finance in the UK is valued at around £40billion, creating thousands of sustainable job opportunities.
Today, with the world facing a climate emergency there is a pressing need to develop environmentally sustainable financial solutions.

ByQuantum Communications

Nicola Sturgeon – Scotland can be global HQ of ethical finance

First Minister Nicola Sturgeon is to deliver the keynote address at a world summit that will promote Scotland as the international home of ethical finance.

Ethical Finance 2019 will be hosted by the Scotland-based Global Ethical Finance Initiative (GEFI) in Edinburgh on October 8 and 9, bringing together over 300 senior representatives from more than 200 companies and organisations.

Ms Sturgeon will say Scotland can be the global headquarters of ethical finance, while there will also be a video address from the Archbishop of Canterbury.

GEFI works towards a fairer finance system for people and the planet, focusing on sustainability, climate change and social justice.
Ethical finance in the UK is valued at around £40billion, creating thousands of sustainable job opportunities.

Scotland has a long history of social enterprise with a growing reputation in ethical finance. The robust financial services sector in Scotland has strong ethical roots, and a reputation for innovation, research and development. It is a world leader in climate change and has an opportunity to build on this when Glasgow hosts the UN’s climate change summit, COP26, in 2020.

First Minister Nicola Sturgeon said:
“Scotland’s approach to economic growth is centred on making sure that it is inclusive, sustainable and fair.
“Those same values are at the core of the global discussion on ethical finance, a discussion that has a natural home in Edinburgh the heart of Scotland’s thriving financial sector, with a long history and global reputation for innovation.
“Ethical Finance 2019 will bring financial leaders together to demonstrate the vital role finance will play in addressing the most pressing global challenges and creating positive change – and I look forward to taking part.”

Omar Shaikh, managing director of GEFI, said:
“Scotland has been a pioneer in financial innovation and the development of professional standards.
“The failure of trickle-down economics to fairly distribute wealth and encourage inclusive growth, the damaging impact on the planet of the unchecked pursuit of profit, and the banking scandals of the past decade means that ethical finance has never been more popular or needed.
“At this global summit we will explore how to create a better holistic system of financial management that delivers both profit and social returns, and positions Scotland as the global HQ of ethical finance.”

ENDS

NOTES TO EDITORS

More information on the Global Ethical Finance Initiative is available here: https://www.globalethicalfinance.org/

More information on the summit, including details on tickets and speakers, is available here: https://www.globalethicalfinance.org/ethical-finance-week-2019/

What is the Global Ethical Finance Initiative?
The Global Ethical Finance Initiative (GEFI) oversees, organises and coordinates a series of programmes to promote finance for positive change.
It brings together the world’s business, political, and social leaders to build a fairer finance system for people and the planet.

What is ethical finance?
A fairer system of financial management that combines profit with better outcomes for people and the planet.
The full working definition of ethical finance:
A system of financial management or investment that seeks qualitative outcomes other purely the management of returns. Outcomes sought may reflect ideas from faith, environmental and governance theories.

Why does ethical finance matter?
Although ethical finance is not a new concept the financial crisis has led to a growing interest in sustainability, climate change and social justice. This has seen a collective desire to create a fairer, more inclusive and responsible global financial system.
Trust in banks is diminishing and today’s generation of consumers believes that investment decisions should reflect the issues they care about. Ethical finance in the UK is valued at around £40billion, creating thousands of sustainable job opportunities.
Today, with the world facing a climate emergency there is a pressing need to develop environmentally sustainable financial solutions.

ByQuantum Communications

Warning over bogus callers

We helped our client, consumeradvice.scot, target the media today to spread an important warning about bogus callers operating in Scotland.

We provide press releases that are ready-made news stories for journalists, using our expert knowledge of the media.

PRESS RELEASE

WARNING OVER BOGUS CALLERS IN SCOTLAND

Scots have been warned about bogus callers who are offering services such as landscape gardening in a bid to gain access to properties.
A ‘distraction burglary’ was recently reported at a home in Inverness where the occupant responded to a bogus leaflet offering landscape works. They invited workmen to attend and a robbery subsequently took place.
This is a popular time of the year for this kind of activity, with many householders keen to prepare their gardens for the autumn and considering jobs that need done before the weather turns.
Everyone in Scotland can receive free and confidential advice if they think they may have been approached by a bogus caller or want tips on what to look out for to ensure a service is legitimate.
consumeradvice.scot is the country’s new dedicated consumer advice service which provides advice, assistance and information to people on a range of consumer issues and concerns. The service can pass information to Trading Standards teams for investigation.
Anyone who has been the victim of a crime should report it to Police Scotland on 101 or 999 if a crime is in progress.

Lorna Yelland, team leader with consumeradvice.scot, said:
“Bogus callers and rogue traders are a problem all-year round, but offers of landscape gardening are particularly common at this time of year.
“It’s despicable that people are preying on householders like this, particularly vulnerable residents.
“The best advice is to not respond to unsolicited leaflets unless you are absolutely confident the service is legitimate and do not give away any information if a caller arrives at your door.
“Only use tradespeople you completely trust. Approved tradespeople leaflets are often distributed by local councils.
“Remember, most reputable traders don’t need to knock on doors to get work.
“Our advisers can offer tips on what to look out for to check that a service is legitimate.”

Fiona Richardson, chief executive of Trading Standards Scotland, said:
“We would always advise that you do not immediately contract with someone who cold calls you on the doorstep. Make sure you get several quotes before undertaking any work of this type and do ask friends and neighbours for recommendations.”

Chief Superintendent David Duncan, of Police Scotland’s Safer Communities, said:
“Bogus callers and rogue traders are indiscriminate and will call at any house they can, looking to con the occupant and line their own pockets.
“The more vulnerable in our society do continue to be the main target for these fraudsters and I would urge people to please look out for their elderly or otherwise vulnerable friends, relatives and neighbours – but please also spare a thought for yourself. These criminals can be very plausible and persuasive and it can be easy to be taken in by them.
“There are simple steps you can take when a cold caller arrives at your door, such as using a door chain so as not to let them into your home, or checking their identity by independent means – but if you are concerned, please do not feel embarrassed to report this to police as it’s only by receiving these reports that we can build a picture of the fraudulent activity and take action. Genuine callers will expect you to be careful. Call 999 if you feel scared or intimidated.
“Please be alert – these criminals constantly move from place to place to carry out their con – bogus callers and rogue traders could, unfortunately, be found on a street near you but together we can bring down their criminal enterprise and keep our communities safe.”

ENDS

NOTES TO EDITORS

consumeradvice.scot is operated by the charity Advice Direct Scotland. Consumers can seek help in a number of different ways: freephone 0808 164 6000; online and web chat at www.consumeradvice.scot; and email via advice@consumeradvice.scot

Consumer advisors can provide practical and impartial advice on how to resolve consumer problems, inform people of consumer laws which may apply to their situation, provide template letters which consumers can use to contact the trader or service provider they are having issues with, and pass relevant information onto Trading Standards for further investigation. They cannot make a complaint on an individual’s behalf or carry out any legal action on an individual’s behalf.

Contact: Alan Roden at alan@quantumcommunications.co.uk or 07753 904 531

ByQuantum Communications

Archbishop of Canterbury – investors must help avert climate crisis

The Archbishop of Canterbury, the Most Reverend Justin Welby, has recorded a video for our client, the Global Ethical Finance Initiative (GEFI), ahead of this autumn’s world summit on ethical finance in Edinburgh.

We secured fantastic media coverage in The Guardian, Press Association, The Herald, The Ecologist, The National, Sunday Post, Yahoo News, The Yorkshire Post and many other titles.

More information on the summit, including details on tickets and speakers, is available here: https://www.globalethicalfinance.org/ethical-finance-week-2019/

PRESS RELEASE FROM THE GLOBAL ETHICAL FINANCE INITIATIVE

ARCHBISHOP OF CANTERBURY – INVESTORS MUST HELP AVERT CLIMATE CRISIS

The Archbishop of Canterbury, the Most Reverend Justin Welby, has urged investors to help avert the climate crisis ahead of a global summit on ethical finance.

Archbishop Welby said the investment community has ‘not sufficiently stepped up to the plate’, and said it is in ‘investors’ power to help avert the disastrous consequences’ of failing to achieve the Paris climate change goals.

He has recorded a video for the Global Ethical Finance Initiative (GEFI) ahead of this autumn’s world summit on ethical finance in Edinburgh, Scotland, which will bring together global leaders in business, politics, banking and investment to shape a fairer finance system.

The summit on October 8 and 9 is supported by the Scottish Government, and bodies represented will include the United Nations, the Bank of England, the Financial Conduct Authority, RBS, Baillie Gifford and HSBC, with over 500 senior representatives from more than 200 companies and organisations in attendance.

Ethical finance is a fairer system of financial management that combines profit with better outcomes for people and the planet.

GEFI aims to make Scotland the global headquarters of ethical finance.

The Archbishop of Canterbury, the Most Reverend Justin Welby, said:

“Money is not morally neutral – it can do harm and it can do good.

“At the very least it is the responsibility of investors to take account of environmental, social and governance factors in their investment decisions and in their stewardship of their assets.

“At its best, ethical finance can drive positive change in the world, while still being responsible for its investors.

“It can ensure that while meeting investors’ risk return requirements, investments benefit people and planet.”

Addressing climate change, the Archbishop said ‘the investment community has not sufficiently stepped up to the plate’.

He said: “The situation we find ourselves in has rightly been called a climate emergency.

“We know it’s unquestionable that investors acting together can influence outcomes on everything, including climate change.

“It is in investors’ power to help avert the disastrous consequences – ethical and financial – of failing to achieve the Paris goals.

“Passive investment, with investment decisions controlled and influenced by the algorithms and index calculations, may be the right investment solution for many, but passive stewardship is the answer for no one.

“All investors can make a difference by engaging and voting determinably in support of the Paris Agreement.”

Omar Shaikh, managing director of GEFI, said:

“We need a fairer system of financial management that delivers more than just profit.

“Trust in banks is diminishing following the global crash and today’s generation of consumers – particularly millennials – believe that investment decisions should reflect the issues they care about, such as tackling climate change.

“Green finance solutions are needed in the face of a climate emergency.

“This global summit will explore how to create a better system of financial management that works for people and the planet.”

ByQuantum Communications

Used cars are most common issue for Scotland’s new consumer service

Complaints and queries about used cars are the most common issue handled by Scotland’s new national consumer service.

New figures for July show that an average of 12 people contacted consumeradvice.scot about a used car sale every day.

Buyers raised problems after purchasing vehicles relating to lights, oil leaks or engine failure.

There were also complaints about incorrect sales descriptions, enquiries about warranties, and discoveries that finance agreements remain in place from a previous owner.

Many customers were exasperated after multiple attempts to solve the problem with car dealers and sellers.

There were 364 queries related to used cars last month, with 4,946 contacts in total.

consumeradvice.scot, which was launched in April this year with Scottish Government funding following the devolution of further powers to Holyrood, provides free and impartial advice to people on any consumer issues.

Experts advise people of their legal rights, such as the Consumer Rights Act 2015 which includes a short-term right to reject goods of unsatisfactory quality within 30 days.

consumeradvice.scot can also refer complaints to Trading Standards Scotland for investigation, but cannot carry out legal action on a consumer’s behalf.

consumeradvice.scot team leader Lorna Yelland said:
“The new consumeradvice.scot service is handling tens of thousands of calls and online queries from consumers across Scotland, ranging from questions about building work to parking fines to furniture sales.
“But used cars have proved to be the most common issue raised this summer, with buyers not sure what to do if something goes wrong after buying a second-hand vehicle.
“The new consumeradvice.scot service is free for everyone in Scotland, regardless of circumstances, and experts are available to offer impartial advice.
“Consumers shouldn’t be left in the dark about their rights.”



NOTES TO EDITORS
consumeradvice.scot is operated by the charity Advice Direct Scotland. Consumers can seek help in a number of different ways: freephone 0808 164 6000; online and web chat at www.consumeradvice.scot; and email via advice@consumeradvice.scot

Consumer advisors can provide practical and impartial advice on how to resolve consumer problems, inform people of consumer laws which may apply to their situation, provide template letters which consumers can use to contact the trader or service provider they are having issues with, and pass relevant information onto Trading Standards for further investigation. They cannot make a complaint on an individual’s behalf or carry out any legal action on an individual’s behalf.

ByQuantum Communications

Making Scotland the global HQ of ethical finance

Our client, the Global Ethical Finance Initiative, was published in the Scotland on Sunday newspaper.

Read the article from managing director Omar Shaikh here.

The Global Ethical Finance Initiative (GEFI) oversees, organises and coordinates a series of programmes to promote finance for positive change. It brings together the world’s business, political, and social leaders to build a fairer finance system for people and the planet.

Do you want to increase the media profile of your organisation? We specialise in media affairs. Get in touch by emailing alan@quantumcommunications.co.uk

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